Articles – Ways to help parents protect children from online porn

Ways to help parents protect children from online porn
Straitstimes Jul 8 2002I REFER to the article ‘Web address error leads surfers to porn’ (ST, July 4), which highlighted the incident where users of the Singapore Exchange website were redirected to a pornographic site by mistake.

The Parents Advisory Group for the Internet (PAGi) would like to take this opportunity to stress the importance of Internet safety education, especially for children who could stumble into undesirable sites unknowingly.

For parents less familiar with the Internet, filtering software installed on their personal computers or the family access network services from the Internet service providers can help parents manage their children’s safe use of the Internet.

However, we also understand that technology is not a foolproof solution when it comes to sieving out people with malicious intent who may try to lure unsuspecting children.

Hence, the PAGi would like to stress that parental supervision and guidance are key to ensuring child safety on the Internet.

It believes in empowering parents who can in turn guide their children on the safe use of the Internet. It has launched several initiatives to create awareness of the importance of Net safety.

One of the most recent is the launch of the VCD, ‘Caught in the Web’. Parents can download this from the PAGi website, http://www.pagi.org.sg

The latest initiative is a collaboration with the One Learning Place (OLP) where both organisations are jointly conducting Internet and online-safety workshops. These courses introduce the online world to parents, providing them with practical advice on how to guide their children on the discerning and responsible use of the Internet.

The PAGi and OLP have lined up two workshops this month. Those interested can register for these workshops by contacting OLP on 6354-9699 or visiting the PAGi website for more information.

The Article from ST the above is talking about:

Web address error leads surfers to porn
Straitstimes Jul 4 2002

Link on Singapore Exchange website to local high-precision plastics firm redirects users to porn site. The mistake has since been rectified

THOSE looking for information on local manufacturing company Avaplas on the Singapore Exchange (SGX) website yesterday ended up staring at pictures of naked women.

Top managers at the high-precision engineering plastics maker had no clue that the surfer was being pointed to http://www.avaplas.com and, in turn, redirected to a pornographic site.

Nor did the SGX, which rectified the problem immediately and apologised for ‘any inconvenience caused to our customers’.

The company’sCyber-squatters SUCH Net users register attractive domain names, put a price tag on them and wait for someone to come asking. In Avaplas’ case, it found in May 2000 that cyber-squatters had registered http://www.avaplas.com earlier.

Avaplas chose to use www.avaplas.com.sg instead, but early this year, someone who claimed to be acting as an intermediary for the domain owner offered to sell the site to Avaplas for about US,000 (S,885). correct address is http://www.avaplas.com.sg

But Avaplas’ finance manager Chan Kok Hock told how the company had tried to register the http://www.avaplas.com domain name as it was being listed in May 2000.

After it found that the name had already been taken, it settled on tagging .sg as a suffix as it was a largely Singapore-based company.

But sometime early this year, Mr Chan received an e-mail from someone who claimed to be acting as an intermediary for the domain owner.

The person offered to sell the site to Avaplas for about US,000 (S,885). The company made a counter-offer, but did not hear from the person again.

He declined to say what the counter-offer was.

Then, a few weeks ago, a job-seeker who typed in the wrong address alerted the company about the naked pictures.

The revelation surprised company chief executive officer Boone Quek.

‘Before this, I didn’t know there were such unscrupulous people who abuse technology and can come up with these pranks,’ he said.

Mr Chan said it may approach the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, a body that oversees the assignment of Internet addresses and handles domain-name disputes.

Avaplas has since sought legal advice and is considering making a police report on the matter.

As for the link on the SGX site, both men had no idea how that came about or how long the link had been there.

The company had not given any information to the SGX for its site, which provides information on some 500 listed companies for investors.

Contacted last night, a spokesman for SGX said: ‘There was an error in the posting of this website address. It has since been corrected. We apologise for any inconvenience caused to our customers.’

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